Review of the shocking ‘Mr Darcy’s Letter’

dletterreynoldsIf I should describe one of Abigail Reynolds’ books, namely Mr Darcy’s Letter in one word, it would be: Shocking. Shocking but in a good way, I’m not complaining! 😀 There is one particular part of the plot which was shocking to me, but that event was so powerful that I need to use that word for the whole book.

I can’t decide to give any spoilers or not because, honestly, when I read a review before I read the book, I do prefer to know at least some of the twists and turns. I’m not the sort of woman who is not going to read it just because she knows everything, on the contrary. I’m still interested in the characters, the language and how the author solves the problems.

Probably I’ll talk in general and in the end of the review i’ll give the biggest spoiler which explains why I sad it is shocking – so you can read it on or ignore it 😉

The plot starts in Hunsford the morning after Elizabeth refused Darcy. She meets Darcy who wants to give her the famous letter but she decides not to accept it. Later, he gave it to her with a help of a friend but she burns it without reading it. Elizabeth goes to Pemberley as in Pride and Prejudice but I constantly had to remind myself that Wickham’s character is not known for Lizzy, as she hasn’t read the letter.

The characters are wonderfully written and very close to Jane Austen’s original characters. From Pride an Prejudice my favourite character is Mrs Gardiner. In this variation she is as amazing as in the original. The Gardiner’s connection with Elizabeth and later with Darcy is remarkable.

The language is perfect (I’m not native but I believe the writer. As I see it, the words, the sentences, the expressions could be Jane Austen’s) Very clever from Ms Reynolds that she does put fun, kind, caring words into E and D’s mouth when the scene requires it. They are talking very when they need to and they don’t talk to each other when the plot requires that, what leads to missunderstandings. I also like that the narrator makes it clear that Elizabeth sees more than in the original PP. (For e.g. “He gave her a warm smile that set her heart beating a little harder. Even she could recognize that look indicated something beyond platonic friendship.”) As always in novels they could have been together after 50 pages, but with twists and turns they are parted again.

It is quiet funny because I hate Wickham and I have no idea why does everyone include Wickham in their variations. I’ve read a book from Susan Mason-Milks, called Mr Darcy’s Proposal. It’s 500 or more pages and he doesn’t appear until the 300. I thought she could have missed the whole Wickham story and the book could be still perfect. It could have worked without Wickham. In Abigail’s case I did miss Wickham in the end and instead of the event happened to Bingley I would have explain Darcy’s dealings with Wickham. I found the Bingley twist in the plot useless, annoying, heartbreaking and unnecessary.

Darcy’s second proposal was okay, but thanks God (or Abigail) Elizabeth didn’t missinterpret and she was very honest to Darcy. At some point I was afraid the author doesn’t let them to be happy so soon, not even for a few days.

And now we arrived to the point where I should let you know why did I say it was shocking. 😀 This part is a SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER
so, they made love before they were married. It was shocking to me as much as you wouldn’t expect Elizabeth and Darcy to do so, it was absolutely right and you can see why did they do it. There were so much tension, emotion between them that you don’t want them to stop.
It does sound wierd when I say that I wouldn’t expect it from Lizzy and Darcy because they are more than 200 years old FICTIONAL characters , but after all they are a regency gentleman and gentleman’s daughter… and we (or I) absolutley idealize them.

Abigail Reynolds, Mr Darcy’s Letter on amazon UK

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s